Acute effects of prone asanas and Pal’s pranayama on myalgia, headache, psychological stress and respiratory problems in the COVID-19 patients in the recovery phase

Authors

  • Gopal Krushna Pal
  • Nivedita Nanda
  • Manoharan Renugasundari
  • Pravati Pal
  • Uttareshwar Pachegaonkar

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.51248/.v40i4.334

Keywords:

COVID-19, Prone asanas, Pal’s pranayama, Recovery from COVID-19, Perceived stress scale

Abstract

Introduction and Aim: It has been observed that recovery from COVID-19 is delayed due to continuation of myalgia, fatigue, headache and some respiratory problems even after the discharge from the hospital. Reports indicate the improvement of sensory, cardiorespiratory and psychological functions following practice of Prone asanas and Pal’s pranayama. Therefore, we conducted a pilot study to assess if practice of asanas in prone posture and slow breathing exercise of Pal’s pranayama schedule can facilitate recovery from the COVID-19 illness and alleviate post-recovery complications in these patients.

Materials and Methods: This is an interventional pilot study conducted in COVID positive patients. A structured module of prone asanas and Pal’s pranayama schedule was given to the COVID positive patients in addition to the routine medical treatments and their stress levels were assessed prior to and after the practice. Also, the acute effects of asana-pranayama schedule on the improvement of cardiorespiratory functions and occurrence of other complications in the recovery phase was recorded.

Results: Following practice of asana-pranayama schedule, the patients recovered faster from myalgia, fatigue, headache and respiratory problems and they had a feeling of well-being. Further, the complications in the recovery phase of COVID-19 were prevented and the intensity of stress was reduced with the practice of asana-pranayama schedule.

Conclusion: This pilot study has shed some light on the early recovery and the prevention of complications in the recovery phase of COVID-19.

Author Biographies

Gopal Krushna Pal

Professor (Senior Scale), Department of Physiology, Program Director, Advance Center for Yoga, JIPMER, Puducherry, India

Nivedita Nanda

Department of Biochemistry, JIPMER, Puducherry, India

Manoharan Renugasundari

Department of Physiology, 2Department of Biochemistry, JIPMER, Puducherry, India

Pravati Pal

Department of Physiology, 2Department of Biochemistry, JIPMER, Puducherry, India

Uttareshwar Pachegaonkar

Sri Aurobindo Society, Puducherry, India

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Published

2021-01-01

How to Cite

1.
Pal GK, Nanda N, Renugasundari M, Pal P, Pachegaonkar U. Acute effects of prone asanas and Pal’s pranayama on myalgia, headache, psychological stress and respiratory problems in the COVID-19 patients in the recovery phase. Biomedicine [Internet]. 2021Jan.1 [cited 2021May14];40(4):526-30. Available from: https://biomedicineonline.org/index.php/home/article/view/334

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Original Research Articles