Effect of battle rope training on functional movements in young adults

Authors

  • Muthukumaran Jothilingam
  • S. Roobha
  • R. Revathi
  • N. Paarthipan
  • S. Saravan Kumar

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.51248/.v40i4.339

Keywords:

Functional movements, battle rope, functional training

Abstract

Introduction and Aim: The battle rope exercise had obtained highest peak and mean VO2, highest energy expenditure and highest exercise heart rate than other exercises. There is no related evidence for Battle rope exercises by screening functional movement. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of battle rope training on functional movement screening. 

Methodology: According to inclusion and exclusion criteria 30 subjects were selected. They were explained about the safety and simplicity of the procedure and by the lottery system they were divided into two groups with 15 subjects in each group. Each subject has undergone pre-test and post-test measurement of functional movement screening (FMS). Group A participants did regular set of floor exercises like pelvic bridging, bird dog exercise, cat and camel exercise for 4 weeks. Group B participants did pelvic bridging, bird dog exercise, cat and camel exercise and battle rope training for 4 weeks. The data collected and tabulated, were statistically analysed. Functional movements: 7patterns of functional movements include deep squat, hurdle step, inline lunge, rotary stability, active straight leg raise, shoulder mobility, and trunk stability push-up.

Results: The result of this study were statistically significant in FMS pretest and posttest with the p values (p<0.0001). Between the posttest mean and standard deviation of FMS of both group A and group B are 14.53(2.78), and15.43 (2.60) respectively. And there was a significant difference among the values (p >0.0001).

Conclusion: This study concludes that battle rope training is better than traditional floor exercises in improving functional movements among young adults because of its simulation of functional movement patterns.

Author Biographies

Muthukumaran Jothilingam

Associate Professor,  Saveetha College of Physiotherapy,  Saveetha Medical College and Hospital, Saveetha Institute of Medical and Technical Sciences, Chennai, India

S. Roobha

BPT Intern,  Saveetha College of Physiotherapy,  Saveetha Medical College and Hospital, Saveetha Institute of Medical and Technical Sciences, Chennai, India

R. Revathi

BPT Intern,  Saveetha College of Physiotherapy, Saveetha Medical College and Hospital, Saveetha Institute of Medical and Technical Sciences, Chennai, India

N. Paarthipan

Professor Department of Radiology, Saveetha Medical College and Hospital, Saveetha Institute of Medical and Technical Sciences, Chennai, India

S. Saravan Kumar

Assistant Professor, Saveetha College of Physiotherapy, Saveetha Medical College and Hospital, Saveetha Institute of Medical and Technical Sciences, Chennai, India

References

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Published

2021-01-01

How to Cite

1.
Jothilingam M, Roobha S, Revathi R, Paarthipan N, Saravan Kumar S. Effect of battle rope training on functional movements in young adults. Biomedicine [Internet]. 2021Jan.1 [cited 2021May14];40(4):547-50. Available from: https://biomedicineonline.org/index.php/home/article/view/339

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Section

Short Communications